Research results support the need to consider men and women as both potential victims and perpetrators when approaching IPV

Published in the International Journal of Public Health here >>

Abstract

We aimed to assess intimate partner violence (IPV) among men and women from six cities in six European countries. Four IPV types were measured in a population-based multicentre study of adults (18-64 years; n = 3,496). Sex- and city-differences in past year prevalence were examined considering victims, perpetrators or both and considering violent acts’ severity and repetition. Male victimization of psychological aggression ranged from 48.8 % (Porto) to 71.8 % (Athens) and female victimization from 46.4 % (Budapest) to 70.5 % (Athens).

Male and female victimization of sexual coercion ranged from 5.4 and 8.9 %, respectively, in Budapest to 27.1 and 25.3 % in Stuttgart. Male and female victims of physical assault ranged from 9.7 and 8.5 %, respectively, in Porto, to 31.2 and 23.1 % in Athens. Male victims of injury were 2.7 % in Östersund and 6.3 % in London and female victims were 1.4 % in Östersund and 8.5 % in Stuttgart. IPV differed significantly across cities (p < 0.05).

Men and women predominantly experienced IPV as both victims and perpetrators with few significant sex-differences within cities. Results support the need to consider men and women as both potential victims and perpetrators when approaching IPV.

Intimate partner violence: a study in men and women from six European countries (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/272518443_Intimate_partner_violence_a_study_in_men_and_women_from_six_European_countries [accessed Mar 06 2018].

Australia: One in Three In-depth Analysis – responds to latest attack upon male victims by Daily Life

(This article originally appeared here >>)

On January 25th, Fairfax blog Daily Life published an article by Jane Gilmore titled Fact or fiction: Every third victim of intimate partner violence is a male. The article was the latest in a series of attacks upon male victims of domestic violence by the publication.

This is the One in Three Campaign’s in-depth response (a short version is here).

Men’s Rights Activists or advocates for male victims?

Ms Gilmore starts by referring to the One in Three Campaign as “A Men’s Rights Activist website,” in what appears to be an attempt to smear the name of the Campaign within certain circles where the term “MRA” is used pejoratively.

If you check the Internet Archive of our website you will find we have never used this term as we don’t identify as MRAs. As our front page states,

One in Three is a diverse group of male and female professionals – academics, researchers, social workers, psychologists, counsellors, lawyers, health promotion workers, trainers and survivor/advocates. The Campaign aims to raise public awareness of the existence and needs of male victims of family violence and abuse; to work with government and non-government services alike to provide assistance to everyone affected by family violence; and to reduce the incidence and impacts of family violence on Australian men, women and children.

Attacks upon ABS data

Gilmore goes on to claim that our presentation of verified data from such organisations as the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and the Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC) is “straight up wrong,” “misinformation” and “baseless myths”.

The author analyses in detail the verified ABS statistic on our infographic that “the proportion of men experiencing current partner violence between 2005 and 2016, rose more than fivefold, a 552 per cent increase”.

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The Press Editorial – Government’s proposed abuse inquiry doesn’t go far enough

From an original article here on stuff.co.nz >>

It is disappointing that a government inquiry into past abuse of children will be limited to those cases which originated in state care. An opportunity to address systemic abuse in non-government institutions, and particularly religious organisations, is likely to be lost.

The inquiry is one of the Government’s pledges for its first 100 days in office and will be announced shortly. However, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has already said that inquiries will begin with “the harm that we (the State) had direct responsibility for”.

Victims’ groups have called on the Government to follow Australia’s example and include non-governmental organisations such as churches, charities, community groups and sports clubs in the inquiry. For now, at least, the Government appears to be ruling this out.

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Gordon Campbell on the inquiry into the abuse of children in care

By Gordon Campbell, from an original article here on scoop.co.nz >>

Apparently, PM Jacinda Ardern has chosen to exclude faith-based institutions from the government’s promised inquiry into the abuse of children in state care. Any role for religious institutions – eg the Catholic Church – would be only to observe and to learn from any revelations that arise from the inquiry’s self-limiting focus on state-run institutions:

[Ardern] said the primary role of the inquiry was to look at the state’s responsibility….She said any religious institution with concerns needed to look at the issue, ask what they have done about the issues and their own history.

Such a narrowing of focus would be unfortunate, for a whole variety of reasons, and not merely because a more wide-ranging commission of inquiry in Australia found a high prevalence of children in care being sexually assaulted within religious institutions.

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Australia: One in Three Media Release: domestic violence – the facts our media won’t tell you

One in Three, based in Australia is a diverse group of male and female professionals – academics, researchers, social workers, psychologists, counsellors, lawyers, health promotion workers, trainers and survivor/advocates.

They issued a press release on the 16th January 2018 on domestic violence. You can read this below. Visit their website here: oneinthree.com.au

1IN3+media+release+16-01-18

Conference Resolution Requesting Royal Commission

Update 21 December

MSSAT Aotearoa endorses a submission from the Network of Survivors of Faith-based Institutional Abuse and their Supporters for the extension of a public enquiry into the abuse of children in state care to include all faith-based institutions. The submission presents the rationale for the extension of the enquiry and and the risks of not doing so.

You can download the submission here >>

 


Update: 3 December 2017

PM confirms inquiry into state care abuse will be independent

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has confirmed an inquiry into abuse suffered in state care will be independent.

 She told TV3’s programme The Hui this morning the stories she’s heard have truly shocked her.

“There is no independent way to complain about what happens to you in our system and that is unacceptable, when you have powers like that held by the state – there has to be an independent complaints process.

“I want to know more, we are going into this with an open heart and with a chance to do things differently and that’s what I want to come out of this,” Ms Ardern said.

Read the full story here >>

 


The attendees at the 2017 International Conference of the South South Institute, Christchurch, New Zealand, 5-10 November 2017, have passed the following resolution and ask that it be presented to the Prime Minister of New Zealand by Phillip Chapman (Chair) and Ken Clearwater (National Advocate) for the Male Survivors of Sexual Abuse Trust, Aotearoa New Zealand (MSSAT Aotearoa) who are hosting this conference.

Download the Resolution here >>

View the Resolution below:

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Australia: One in Three Campaign supplementary submission to Federal Parliamentary Inquiry published

(This article originally appeared here >>)

One in Three appeared on the 5th of September 2017 before the Canberra Hearing of the Federal Inquiry into a better family law system to support and protect those affected by family violence.

On 6th October 2017, we lodged a supplementary submission and answers to questions on notice, which includes in-depth case studies of two male victims of family violence, along with addidional data that dispels some of the dangerous myths about male victims.

The Inquiry has now published our supplementary submission on its website.

You can also download a copy of the supplementary submission from here (our original submission can be found here, and the transcript of our appearance at the Canberra Hearing can be found here).

You will notice that sections of the case studies have been redacted by the Inquiry for reasons of anonymity.